Every gig is an opportunity to show off your work, learn new things and improve your skills. At the end of every gig, you get to rate the business. The business also gets to rate you and provide specific feedback that will help you improve your work in future gigs. 

Here’s what each area of feedback means: 

Cell phone usage: 

Using your cell phone during the gig is inappropriate. It distracts you and other workers from the task at hand. It’s also considered poor hygiene to use mobile phones during a gig as they can contribute to food contamination. Once you’re checked-in to the gig, put your mobile phone away and only use it during breaks or at the end of the gig.


Incorrect attire:

Every gig is unique and may require specific attire. Pay attention to the gig instructions on the gigs booking page for the requested dress code: Black bistro, White bistro, Non-slip shoes, etc. and any other instructions.

It’s absolutely critical that you follow the gig instructions and wear the correct attire every time. It’s also important to maintain some basic level of hygiene: 

  • Wear clean clothes. No stains or dirty/soiled fabric
  • No body odor or heavy perfume/cologne
  • Keep nails short and clean
  • If you have long hair, tie it back in a ponytail or bun

Remember that appearances matter!


Punctuality/ Left early

When you accept a gig, you’re making a commitment to work for the specific gig duration (from start to end time). 

Start time is when you’re supposed to start working, not when you arrive at the gig. Make sure you arrive 10-15 min before the gig starts to give yourself enough time to get ready. Businesses are counting on you to start working right on time. 

End time is when you’re supposed to end the gig in the app and communicate with your gig contact that you’re about to leave. Unless the gig contact allows you to leave early, or in case of an emergency (make sure you communicate with your gig contact), you should stay until the end of the gig. Businesses are also counting on you to help them out until the end of the gig. It’s not best practice to leave the gig early without warning. 


Skills need improvement

We know you are a professional and you have great skills. But sometimes skills don’t match up to businesses expectations. For example: 

  • You've worked as a bartender at a beer and wine bar only and the bartender gig you booked requires someone who knows how to make elaborate drinks like a Mai Tai or Moscow Mule. You've never made a Mai Tai or Moscow Mule before. 
  • You have your own way of cutting vegetables and the kitchen staff expects you to display specific knife skills different than what you're used to. It takes you a lot longer to follow their way. 
  • You've always worked as a server in casual restaurants and the server gig you booked is at a Country Club where a "ballet of serving" is required and you have no idea of what that means. 

The same goes for other positions that require specific skills. Take this feedback as an opportunity to learn and develop new skills for future gigs. 


Speed:

Every business moves at its own pace. Some events flow very easily and others can feel hectic and fast-paced. No matter the pace of the gig, always do your best to move fast. Get things done quickly and move on to new tasks. Speed is always the name of the game. 


Not following instructions:

Businesses can be very particular about what needs to be done during the gig as well as HOW it should be done. They will want you to follow their instructions because that’s how they’re used to running their business. Even though you know your craft and you’ve been doing it your way for a while, they expect you to follow their lead and do things their way. Be open-minded and flexible. Accept new ideas and take time to learn new ways of doing things.


Professionalism

“A smile goes a long way” as they say.
It’s important to have a positive attitude during the gig and work well with others. Leave your ego at home. When you work a gig, you're agreeing to be a flexible team player who is proactive and helpful, always looking for extra ways to help the other workers and the business. 

There are many ways to show professionalism during a gig besides being positive and helpful: 

  • Absolutely NO drinking before, during or after the gig while on the premises. 
  • No chewing gum or tobacco during the gig.
  • Avoid interacting with event guests. No dancing, singing, flirting with guests, etc. 
  • Be respectful to your fellow co-workers. Avoid talking too much, dancing, singing and flirting with your fellow co-workers. 
  • Negotiate the number of breaks and duration with your gig contact and stick to it. 
  • Communicate when you need to excuse yourself for any reason (bathroom breaks, family emergency, etc). Over communicating is always better.
  • Avoid complaining or arguing with other workers or the gig contact. Show the best version of yourself every time.
  • Avoid cutting corners and do the work you’re being paid to do. 


Remember that feedback is a gift that allows us to grow and be better. As Bill Gates said: “We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve.” 

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